As Love Island’s Chris Hughes warns about testicular cancer, here are 5 things you need to know

Love Island contestant Chris Hughes has urged his male followers to check for testicular cancer, after finding out his brother has been diagnosed with the disease.

26-year-old Hughes says that his brother Ben was prompted to do a self-examination after the Love Island star had a check for testicular cancer live on ITV’s This Morning, two months ago.

“A sad day,” the former contestant wrote on Instagram. “My brother was diagnosed with testicular cancer this lunchtime, in which we pray for a kind prognosis.

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A sad day. My brother was diagnosed with testicular cancer this lunchtime, in which we pray for a kind prognosis. He came into my room at 3am the morning after my testicular examination on tv, clearly struggling to sleep, telling me he’d found a lump and asked me if he’s checking it right. To which I told him, ‘Ben, it’s 3am, I’ll look in the morning, but if there’s a lump, go and check it checked tomorrow with the doctor’. Today he sent me a message telling me the news, and thanking me for making him aware, else he’d never have known he had cancer.. That literally broke my heart. Testicular cancer is a silent killer, men need realise this and check themselves regularly. It takes 10 seconds. Please do it. 🖤

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“He came into my room at 3am the morning after my testicular examination on TV, clearly struggling to sleep, telling me he’d found a lump and asked me if he’s checking it right.

“Today he sent me a message telling me the news, and thanking me for making him aware, else he’d never have known he had cancer.”

Cancer is easiest to treat when it’s found early, which is why experts stress that you get to know your body, so you can notice any unusual changes. From puberty onwards, the NHS says that men should check their testicles once every month.

Here, we’ve rounded up some simple facts about testicular cancer every guy should know…

1. It’s the most common type of cancer that young men should look out for

Although it’s relatively uncommon overall, testicular cancer is the most common type of cancer to affect men between the ages of 15 and 49.

According to Cancer Research UK, men in their early 30s are the most likely to get it, and it then becomes less common as men get older.

2. Around 2,200 men are diagnosed with it each year in the UK

Testicular cancer is on the rise, but researchers aren’t sure why – twice as many British men get it now as they did in the mid-Seventies.

3. If you’ve already had it in one testicle, your risk rises in the other

Men who’ve previously been diagnosed with testicular cancer are between four and 12 times more likely to develop it in the other testicle.

4. The survival outlook is positive

Thankfully, testicular cancer is one of the most treatable types of cancer, and it has one of the best outlooks for cancers overall.

In England and Wales, almost all men (99%) survive for a year or more after being diagnosed with testicular cancer, and 98% survive for five years or more after diagnosis.

5. The easiest way to detect it is by carrying out a self-examination

A testicular cancer self-examination is the best way to spot the signs of testicular cancer early. According to Cancer Research UK, a good time to feel your testicles is after a warm bath or shower, when the scrotal skin is relaxed.

You should check your testicles for the size and weight, and any lumps or swellings.

Book a doctors appointment if you have an unusual lump or swelling in part of one testicle, a heavy scrotum or an increase in the firmness or feel. Any sharp pains or unusual differences between one testicle and the other should be examined too.

It’s unlikely to be cancer, but it’s worth getting checked out for your own peace of mind.

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